History 397VW: Public History Workshop

Oral History of Safe Passage, a Local Domestic Violence Shelter

Fall 2013

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

TuTh 11:15-12:30 plus lab on Thursdays 12:45-3:45

Professor Laura Lovett

635 Herter Hall

Lovett@history.umass.edu

Office Hours: MW 2:30-3:30 and by appointment

Course Description

            This course will allow students to gain a working knowledge of the process of creating a detailed historical account of the creation of a local domestic violence shelter, Safe Passage. We will learn techniques for researching, interviewing, documenting, recording and editing oral and digital histories. Because of the nature of the interview process and subject matter, students will learn about the ethics of working with human subjects, the process of vetting materials for review boards, and the process of creating a community presentation that respects the privacy and autonomy of actors within that community.

            Because this class will involve work with a community, time for travel to collect interviews is considered part of the "laboratory" part of the class. The specific subject of this workshop has been developed in conjunction with the Valley Women's History Collaborative' s project of documenting the establishment of domestic violence shelters in the Valley in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s.

Learning Objectives:

(1)   Learn how to work with a community to research and produce a historical narrative about them that both respects their agency and provides a critical perspective on their history

(2)   Learn to navigate and assess different perspectives on historical events

(3)   Learn how to do historical research with human subjects that is both respectful and ethical

(4)   Learn how to plan and conduct oral history interviews, prepare transcripts for archives, prepare audio and video results for the public, and prepare a written narrative that incorporates oral history sources.

(5)   Learn how to conduct archival research

(6)   Increase your understanding of U.S. women's history, especially the history of domestic violence activism, as well as, contemporary legal history and the history of the welfare policy in light of neoliberal attempts to restructure state programs.

Evaluation:

(1)   Oral presentation of shared reading relevant to the course topic (see the attached bibliographies as a starting place for article selection)  10%

(2)   Oral History Interviews with 2 Subjects (25% each)

(3)   Research Paper (25%)

(4)   Reflection and Self-Assessment (15%)

You are expected to attend all lectures and laboratory sections.  You must read all of the assigned reading. Please come to class prepared to discuss what you have read. Even if you are a History major, you should review the reading and writing guidelines for history available on the History Department's webpage at http://www.umass.edu/history/links_writing.html

            Laboratory meetings are an integral part of this course. It is important that you are prepared and that you are willing to actively contribute.  Lab meetings may include travel to archives and libraries, to meet interview subjects, and to meet with representatives of Sage Passage in Northampton.

Policies

Academic Honesty

            Plagiarism is a serious violation of expected academic conduct.  Your work must be your own.  If you quote or paraphrase work from someone else, you must give credit and provide a reference for that source.  Links to guidelines on plagiarism, including the official policy on academic honesty, can be found on the following webpage: http://www.umass.edu/history/links_writing.html.  The penalty for plagiarism in this class is zero credit for the assignment in question.

Disability

            If you have a documented disability that may affect your performance in the class, please speak to the instructor as soon as possible so that appropriate arrangements can be made.

Course Schedule (subject to change):  Please read & prepare the materials assigned before the class meets.

Week 1

T          9/3      Public History in Practice

Th       9/5      Domestic Violence as a Historical Issue

                        Reading: 

                           Susan Schecter  Chapters 1, 3, and 9 from Women and Male Violence: The Visions and Struggles of the Battered Women's                           Movement (1987); (PDF1.1; PDF1.2; PDF3; PDF9.1; PDF9.2)

                           Lise Vogel, "Telling Tales: Historians of Our Own Lives", Women Questions: Essays for a Materialist Feminism (New York: Routledge,                               1995): 100- 153 (PDF)

                        LAB:  Introductory Interviews

Week 2

T          9/10    Introduction to Oral History

                        Reading:

                           Linda Shopes, "What is Oral History?" (from making Sense of Evidence series on History Matters:The U.S. Survey on the                             Web, locatedat http://historymatters.gmu.edu)

                          Sherna Berger Gluck, "Women's Oral History: Is it So Special?" In Thinking About Oral History: Theories and                                                   Applications, edited by Thomas L. Charlton, Lois E. Myers, and Rebecca Sharpless. New York: AltaMira Press, 2008. (PDF)

                          Bibliography for Feminist Oral History

Th       9/12    Working with Human Subjects:  IRB and Oral History

                        Reading:

                          "Human Subjects Review and IRB Review" pp.1-7, from Oral History Association website:                                                                                             http://www.oralhistory.org/about/do-oral-history

                          Amelia Fry, "Reflections on Ethics"  from, David K. Dunaway and Willa K. Baum, eds., Oral History: An Interdisciplinary Anthology,                                  (New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers,1996): 161-172 (PDF)

                          Wendy Rickard, "'More Dangerous than Therapy'?: Interviewees' Reflections on Recording Traumatic or Taboo Issues," Oral History                                    26 (1998), 34-48. (PDF)

                        LAB:  Laura Penney from Safe Passage

Week 3

T          9/17    Perspectives on Domestic Violence

                        Reading:

                        Priya Kandaswamy, " 'You Trade in a Man for the Man': Domestic Violence and the U.S. Welfare State", American Quarterly, v.62, no.2,                               (June 2010): 252-277 (Kandaswamy.pdf)

                        Kristin Bumiller, In an Abusive State, (Excerpts) (Bumiller.pdf)

Th       9/19    Discourses of Domestic Violence

                        Reading:

                          Tanya R. Anderson,MD and Ann M.Aviles, MS, "Diverse Faces of Domestic Violence", The ABNF Journal, (Fall 2006):129-132 (Anderson.pdf)

                          Phyllis Goldfarb, "Describing Without Circumscribing: Questioning the Construction of Gender in the Discourse of                                           Intimate Violence", The George Washington Law Review, (1996):1-54 (Goldfarb.pdf)

Donna Ferrato, Images of Domestic Violence

http://donnaferrato.com/domestic-violence/

                        LAB:  Oral and Digital History Training

F          9/20    "Advancing the Economic Security of Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence : A Day Long Summit for Activists and                                   Advocates in Rural Massachusetts" sponsored by the Massachusetts Rural Domestic and Sexual Violence Project and                                   Jane Doe Inc., 9am – 4pm.  Register by September 10th.

Week 4

T          9/24    Conducting and Assessing Oral Histories

                        Reading:

                        Charles Morrissey, "Oral History Interviews: From Inception to Closure", Thomas L. Charlton, Lois E. Myers, and Rebecca                                      Sharpless, eds.,Handbook of Oral History (New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2006): 170-206

Th       9/26    LAB:   Trip to Safe Passage Archive, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College, Northampton, MA

Week 5

T          10/1    Strategy Session for Oral Histories:  Creating an Interview and Research Plan

                        Histories of Domestic Violence: Presentation and Discussion

Th       10/3    No Class

Week 6

T          10/8    Histories of Domestic Violence: Presentation and Discussion

Th       10/10  Pre-interview Research

            LAB:   Oral History Interviews

Week 7

T          10/15  No Class – Monday Schedule

Th       10/17  Histories of Domestic Violence: Presentation and Discussion

            LAB:   Oral History Interviews

Week 8

T          10/22  Histories of Domestic Violence: Presentation and Discussion

Th       10/24  LAB:  Oral History Interviews

Week 9

T          10/29  Histories of Domestic Violence: Presentation and Discussion

Th       10/31LAB:  Oral History Interviews

Week 10

T          11/5    Histories of Domestic Violence: Presentation and Discussion

Th       11/7    LAB:   Oral History Interviews and Presentation Preparation

Week 11

T          11/12  Histories of Domestic Violence: Presentation and Discussion

Th       11/14 Toward a Narrative History of Safe Passage

            LAB:   Oral History Interviews and Presentation Preparation

Week 12

T          11/19  Shelters and the Women's Movement in the Valley

Th       11/21  Group Discussion of Interviews and Contextualization

            LAB: Workshop for Presentations

Week 13

T          11/26  Student Reports and Reflection

Th       11/28  No Class – Thanksgiving

Week 14

T          12/3    Student Reports and Reflection

Th       12/5    Student Reports and Reflection

            LAB: Meet with Safe Passage Liaison for Presentation to Board of Directors and Assessment


Interpersonal Violence (IPV) Bibliography

Tanya R. Anderson,MD and Ann M.Aviles, MS, "Diverse Faces of Domestic Violence", The ABNF Journal, (Fall 2006):129-132

Ping-Hsin Chen, "Relation of Domestic Violence to Health Status among Hispanic Women", Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved,v.20,no.2 (May 2009): 569-582

Ken Corvo and Pamela Johnson, "Vilification of the 'Batterer': How Blame Shapes Domestic Violence Policy and Interventions", Aggression and Violent Behavior,

 8 (2003), 259-281

Michelle Madden Dempsey, "Toward a Feminist State: What Does 'Effective' Prosecution of Domestic Violence Mean?", The Modern Law Review, v.10,no.6 (Nov. 2007):908-935.

Kathleen Ferraro, "The Dance of Dependency: A Genealogy of Domestic Violence Discourse", Hypatia, v.11, no.4, Women and Violence Issue (Autumn 1996):77-91

Phyllis Goldfarb, "Describing Without Circumscribing: Questioning the Construction of Gender in the Discourse of Intimate Violence", The George Washington Law Review, (March1996):1-54

Donilon Loseke,"The Two Realities of Wife Abuse", in Spenser Cahill, Inside Social Life: Readings in Sociological and Psychological Microsociology, Los Angeles: Roxbury Publishing Company, (date):291-299

Linda G. Mills, "Killing Her Softly: Intimate Abuse and the Violence of State Intervention", Harvard Law School Review, v.113, no.2 (Dec.1999): 550-613

Jennifer Nixon, "Marshalling the Evidence: Using Intersectionality in the Domestic Violence Frame", Social Politics :International Studies in Gender, State and Society, v. 17,no.2 (Summer 2010): 137-158

Caroline Picart,  "Rhetorically Reconfiguring Victimhood and Agency: The Violence Against Women Act's Civil Rights Clause", Rhetoric and Public Affairs, v.6,no.1 (Spring 2003):97-125

Polites, Kuchar, Bigelow, "Hope and Healing for Children Affected by Domestic Violence" , Exchange, (January/February 2010): 76-79;

Poole, Beran, Thurston, "Direct and Indirect Services for Children in Domestic Violence Shelters" Journal of Family Violence (2008).23:679-686;

White Paper from the Nation Child Traumatic Stress Network, "Complex Trauma in Children and Adolescents", (2003)

Hillary Potter, "An Argument for Black Feminist Criminology: Understanding African American Women's Experiences with Intimate Partner Abuse Using an Integrated Approach", Feminist Criminology, v.1, no. 2 (April 2006): 106-124

Joshua Price, "The Apotheosis of Home and the Maintenance of Spaces of Violence", Hypatia, v.17,no.4 (Fall 2002):39-70

Janice L. Ristock, "'And Justice for All?'ÉThe Social Context of Legal Responses to Abuse in Lesbian Relationships", CJWLIRFD,v.7 (1994): 415-430

Janice L. Ristock, Chapter One. The Emergence of Lesbian Partner Abuse and Chapter Six: The Politics of Responding to Violence in Lesbian Relationships

Bess Rothenberg, " 'We Don't Have Time for Social Change': Cultural Compromise and the Battered Woman Syndrome" Gender and Society, v.17 (October 2003):771-787

Susan Schecter, Women and Male Violence:The Visions and Struggles of the Battered Women's Movement (Boston: South End Press, 1987). Chapter 1: Before the Movement; Chapter 3: The Emergence of the Battered Women's Movement; Chapter 9: Toward an Analysis of Violence Against Women in the Family

Susan R. Shattuck, "A Domestic Violence Screening Program in a Public Health Department", Journal of Community Health Nursing, v.19, no.3 (2002):121-132

Natalie Sokoloff, "The Intersectional Paradigm and Alternative Visions to Stopping Domestic Violence: What Poor Women, Women of Color, and Immigrant Women Are Teaching Us about Violence in the Family", International Journal of Sociology of the Family, v.34 ,no.2 (Autumn 2008):153-185

Suruchi Thappar-Bjorkert and Karen Morgan, " 'But Sometimes I ThinkÉ They Put Themselves in the Situation": Exploring Blame and Responsibility in Interpersonal Violence", Violence Against Women, v.16 (2010): 32-59

Jill Tiefenthaler, Amy Farmer, and Amandine Sambira, "Services and Intimate Partner Violence in the United States: A County-Level Analysis", Journal of Marriage and the Family, v.67,no.3 (August 2005): 565-578

Kathleen Tierney," The Battered Women Movement and the Creation of the Wife Beating Problem", Social Problems, v.29, no.3 (Feb. 1982) : 207-220

Oral History Bibliography

Historical Sources

Rosalyn Baxandall, "Revisioning the Women's Liberation Movements Narrative: Early Second Wave African American Feminists, Feminist Studies, 27,no.1 (Spring 2001): 225-245

Jane De Hart-Mathews, The New Feminism and the Dynamics of Social Change, Kerber/Dehart-Mathews, Women's America: Refocusing the Past,(New York: Oxford University Press, 1987): 437-466

Lise Vogel, "Telling Tales: Historians of Our Own Lives", Women Questions: Essays for a Materialist Feminism (New York: Routledge, 1995): 100- 153

Rachel DuPlessis and Ann Snitow, The Feminist Memoir Project:Voices from Women's Liberation, New York: Three Rivers Press, 1998

Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women's Movement Changed America, New York, Viking Press, 2000

Gail Collins, When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present , Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 2009

Oral History Theory and Methodology

Alessandro Portelli, "What Makes Oral History Different?" Robert Perks &Alistair Thomson, eds.,The Oral History Reader, (London: Routledge,  63-74

Alessandro Portelli, "Tryin' to Gather a Little Knowledge:Some Thoughts on the Ethics of Oral History" from Battle of Giulia: Oral History and the Art of Dialogue (1997)

Sherna Gluck, "What's So Special about Women? Women's Oral History". Frontiers: A Journal of Women's Studies, v.2,no.2, (Summer 1977): 3-17

Susan Armitage, "The Next Step" in Armitage, Hart, Weathermoon, Women's Oral History (Lincoln: The University of Nebraska Press, 2002): 60-74; follows up on 1977 Gluck article; orig. published 1983)

Susan H. Armitage and Sherna Berger Gluck, "Reflections on Women's Oral History: An Echange" in Armitage, Hart and Weathermoon, Women's Oral History, (Lincoln: The University of Nebraska Press, 2002) : 75-86

Mark Feldstein, "Kissing Cousins: Journalism and Oral History",The Oral History Review,v.31, no.1 (Winter-Spring 2004):1-27

Charles Morrissey, "Oral History Interviews: From Inception to Closure", Thomas L. Charlton, Lois E. Myers, and Rebecca Sharpless, eds.,Handbook of Oral History (New York: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 2006): 170-206

 "General Principles and Best Practices for Oral History"Oral History Association Newsletter ,v. XLIII,no.3 (Winter 2009): 8&9 (Handout)