History 190S: Sex in History-A Global History of the Modern World

T, Th 8:30am-9:20am

Integrated Learning Center S231

Fall 2017

 

 

Professor Laura Lovett                                                       TA: Tanya Pearson

635 Herter Hall                                                                     712 Herter Hall                                

545-6778                                                                                 545-1330

Lovett@history.umass.edu                                                 tpearson@umass.edu

Office Hours: T 10:00am-12:00pm & by Appt                 M 11:00am-1:00pm

 

Course Description: This course will survey topics in global history and the history of sex and sexuality from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. We will explore continuities and changes in the definitions of sex and sexualities, the science and politics of sex and reproduction, the relationships between sex, sexuality, and imperialism, the sexual construction of social and cultural differences in different nations, changing portrayals of sex and sexuality by the state and by the media, social and legal activism with regard to issues of sex and sexuality, and the value of using sex and sexuality as a historical framework for issues in social, cultural, and political history.  4 credits. No prerequisites.  HS, G.

 

I expect everyone in this class to be courteous, cooperative, and supportive of each other at all times.  You may disagree with someone's ideas or values, but please be mindful and respectful of each other's differences.  Some of our conversations may raise difficult topics for you.  Even if a topic is challenging, please try to remain engaged in the conversation. All opinions are welcome.  Please approach other perspectives with a principle of generosity that makes our collective learning the goal of this class.

 

We will create ground rules on the first day of class.  Please see the subsequent online syllabus on the course Moodle page for our agreed upon ground rules for our classroom and online meetings.

 

Goals:

·      Provide multiple historical perspectives on the changing meanings of sexual categories, their development, and their deployment in specific contexts.

·      Provide a survey of events and experiences concerning the history of sex and sexuality which until recently were not given a voice by historians.

·      Explore the relevance of the history of sex and sexuality for global history and for our understanding of contemporary events.

 

General Education Statement

History 190 meets General Education Requirements for Historical and Global Studies: The course introduces students to how the histories of sex and sexuality have developed in many different national and transnational settings over the past 250 years. From the outset, students tackle fundamental questions about the ways in which sex and sexuality have influenced and been influenced by societal, cultural, political, and economic arrangements, while developing in dialogue with racial, religious, national and social class formations. We study documents and discuss conflicting scholarly interpretation of myriad issues. The critical thinking skill and training in empathic imagination prepare students for enlightened and engaged citizenship. Students learn about both societal oppression and individual agency, both categories vital to their discerning the complexities of power in any time and place. Class assignments, ranging from analytic essays to written responses to the reading, require students to grapple logically and creatively with historical topics, to incorporate theories and methods from allied disciplines, and to gain skills in written communication.

 

Texts:

Required.

            Robert M. Buffington, Eithne Luibheid, Donna J. Guy, Editors. A Global History of Sexuality: The Modern Era. (Wiley Blackwell, 2014).  This is available from the UMass Library as an e-book.  You can download a limited number of pages as a PDF.

 

Sex in Global History,  Preliminary Edition.  Laura Lovett, Editor. (Cognella, 2017). You can visit the Cognella Student Store to reserve your copy of the textbook. Payment is not required to reserve a copy. If you reserve a copy, Cognella will contact you directly when the book is ready for purchase. I created this text because I could not find a resource for this class (and wrote about it for the American Historical Association magazine: https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-history/october-2016/sex-and-the-survey-a-new-way-of-teaching-global-history. I have already agreed to give any monetary benefit I receive from assigning my own textbook to the UMASS Scholarship Fund.

To reserve a copy and request a ready-to-purchase notification, please follow the instructions below.

 

1. Visit https://students.universityreaders.com/store/.
2. Create an account or login if you have an existing account.
3. Select your state and then your university from the dropdown menu.
4. Scroll to find your course listing. Locate your textbook within the list of available course materials and click the "Email Me When Ready" button

Optional.

Peter Stearns, World History in Brief: Major Patterns of Change and Continuity, Volume 2 (7th or 8th Edition) (Pearson).

           

Course Website:

http://moodle.oit.umass.edu

 

Discussion Sections:   

1          F 9:05-9:55am            W-25 Machmer

2          F 10:10-11:00am        W-25 Machmer

3          F 12:20-1:10pm         217 Herter

 

Evaluation:

This is a four-unit course.  As such, this course requires additional reading, which will be assessed in weekly writing assignments and exam questions.  This course will also require approximately 12 pages of writing in the form of two assigned papers and weekly writing assignments.

 

Participation                          20%     See below.

Paper 1                                   15%     3-4 pages.  Assigned topics.  Due Friday 9/29.

Midterm                               25%     In class on October 12th.

Paper  2                                  15%     4-5 page paper. Assigned topics.  Due 11/21.

Final                                      25%     In class. 

 

ParticipationYour participation grade has three components: (1) Attendance, (2) Contribution to class discussion, and (3) Moodle discussion participation. You are expected to attend every class meeting, to be prepared, and to contribute to our discussion. Each week you will be asked to respond to a reading question on the Moodle discussion pages for your section. Questions will be posted on Moodle in advance.  Your responses will be due by Thursday at 9pm.  Your responses should demonstrate that you have read and thought about the class material. Each response will be graded on a two point scale: depending on the quality of your response, you will receive two points, one point, or no points.

 

Grade Scale

The University Grade Scale will be followed:

A = 93 and above; A- = 92-90; B+ = 89-88; B = 83-87; B- = 82-80; C+ = 79- 78; C = 73-77; C- = 72-70; D+ = 69-68; D = 63-67; D- 62-60; F = 59 and below.

 

Late Assignments

            Papers handed in late will be graded down one letter grade per day late. Exams cannot be made up without an approved excuse. 

 

Academic Honesty

Plagiarism is a serious violation of expected academic conduct.  Your work must be your own.  If you quote or paraphrase work from someone else, you must give credit and provide a reference for that source.  Links to guidelines on plagiarism, including the official policy on academic honesty, can be found on the following webpage: 

http://www.umass.edu/history/research/writing_resources.html?q=history/writing.html.

For any paper in this course, full and correct citation of all sources will count for 51% of the paper grade.

As a condition of continued enrollment in this course, you agree to submit both papers to the Turnitin service for textual comparison or originality review for the detection of possible plagiarism. All submitted assignments will be included in the UMass Amherst dedicated databases of assignments at Turnitin. These databases of assignments will be used solely for the purpose of detecting possible plagiarism during the grading process and during this term and in the future. Students who do not submit their papers electronically to Turnitin will be required to submit copies of the cover page and first cited page of each source listed in the bibliography with the final paper in order to receive a grade on the assignment.

Recordings and Notes

You may only use the notes you take from class for your own personal use. You may not share or sell these notes via an outside vendor or entity without the faculty/instructor’s permission.  This pertains to in-class recordings as well.  Usage of the notes or in-class recordings in this way without the faculty member’s permission is a violation of the faculty member’s copyright protection.

 

Disabilities

            If you have a documented disability that may affect your performance in the class, please speak to the professor as soon as possible so that appropriate arrangements can be made. I want everyone to get as much as they can out of this class, and I realize that it can take a little while for Disability Services to process accommodation requests, so let me know as soon as possible.

 

Inclusive Language

Language is gender-inclusive and non-sexist when we use words that affirm and respect how people describe, express, and experience their gender. Just as sexist language excludes women’s experiences, non-gender-inclusive language excludes the experiences of individuals whose identities may not fit the gender binary, and/or who may not identify with the sex they were assigned at birth. Identities including trans, intersex, genderqueer and gender non-conforming reflect personal descriptions, expressions, and experiences. Gender-inclusive /non-sexist language acknowledges people of any gender (for example, first year student versus freshman, chair versus chairman, flight attendant versus stewardess or humankind versus mankind, etc). It also affirms all gender identifications and expressions and recognizes the fluidity and variance of sex and gender. Class rosters have a student’s legal first name, unless they have entered a preferred/chosen first name on SPIRE. Pronouns are not included on rosters, so students will be asked to indicate the pronouns they use when they speak. Instructors will identify theirs. We will make every effort to honor these gender identities and expressions. Please feel free to correct us as we learn to include everyone.

 

 

Reading:  You are expected to do the assigned reading in advance of each class. 

 

Schedule (subject to change)

 

Week 1

            Introduction: Thinking about the History of Sex

T          9/5      What to expect from the course and from each other

Th       9/7      Sexuality and the Nation State

             Historicizing Sexuality and Historicizing Nationality

            Reading: Sabine Frühstück, “Sexuality and the Nation-State,” Chapter 2, A Global History of Sexuality

            Special NOTE: This chapter gives us three distinct case studies, 19th century Japan, late 19th and early 20th century US and post-Apartheid South Africa. I have assigned it to allow us to consider how these basic ideas of the nation-state and of sexuality continue to frame one another. Please consider the contemporary examples as something to frame our interpretation of the development of the historical as we begin this class.

 

Friday Discussion:

Questions: How can we understand the emergence of the modern idea of the nation-state and the modern idea of sexuality as co-constructed? How has nation-building around the world been permeated with sex discourse and how has sex discourse been permeated with ideas of nationality?

 

Week 2

T         9/12     New Worlds and their Sexual Representations

            Reading: Sex in Global History: Diary of Christopher Columbus, Read entries for August 3rd and October 11th and 13th.

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 16 (7E &8E), “The West and the World: Discovery, Colonization and Trade”

 

 

Th       9/14     Colonial Exchanges and the Slave Trade

            Reading: Sex in Global History: Olaudah Equiano, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African (1789).

            Sex in Global History: Jennifer Morgan, ““Some Could Suckle Over their Shoulder”: Male Travelers, Female Bodies, and the Gendering of Racial Ideology, 1500-1770”

 

Friday Discussion: Jennifer Morgan’s essay is an example of secondary scholarship in history. As you read this piece, I want you to actively try to distinguish between Morgan’s claims (her arguments or interpretations) and the primary sources she is using. Mark them in two different color inks for part of the essay. Come to Discussion Section prepared to talk about which is a primary source and which is an argument based on a primary. Look at Morgan’s footnotes (in some cases longer than her text) to see what kinds of sources she is using and how. Before you leave discussion, you should have a clear idea of how historians use primary sources.

 

Week 3: World Empires

T         9/19     China, Sex, and Social Order

            Reading:

            Sex in Global History: Ban Zhao, Lessons for Women.

Sex in Global History: “The Natural History of the Chinese Girl,” North China Herald and Supreme Court and Consular Gazette,  July 4, 1890.

            Sex in Global History: “Small feet of the Chinese females: remarks on the origin of the custom of compressing the feet; the extent and effects of the practice; with an anatomical description of a small foot.” Chinese Repository 3 (1835): 537-539.

            Sex in Global History: Susan Mann, “Sexuality and the Other”

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 20, (7E &8E), “East Asia: Vital Trends in Politics and Trade” (Focus on China)

                       

Th       9/23     The Middle East and the Veil

            Reading:

            Sex in Global History: Huda Shaarawi, Harem Years: The Memoirs of an Egyptian Feminist, 1879-1924

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 19 (7E &8E), “The Islamic Empires”

 

Friday Discussion: Last week’s material on China and the Middle East raises questions about family formation and women’s status.  Give an example of how women’s roles were traditionally constructed in each of these cultures, and how they were reconsidered as these cultures modernized.

 

Week 4   

 

T         9/26     Anatomical Differences and the Development of the Two Sex

                        Model in Europe

            Reading:

            Sex in Global History: Aristotle’s Masterpiece, “Of Infants,” (1680)

            Sex in Global History: Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women (1792). Excerpts.

            Sex in Global History: John Barclay, A Series of Engravings Representing the Bones of the Human Skeleton (1819), pp. 140-144.

           

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 17  (7E &8E), “Western Civilization Changes Shape in the Early Modern Centuries”

 

Th     9/28       Sexual Regulation and Reproduction during the Western

                        Industrial Revolution

            Reading: Mytheli Sreenivas, “Sexuality and Modern Imperialism” to page 68, Chapter 3, A Global History of Sexuality

Sex in Global History: Women’s Petition to the National Assembly (1789), French Revolution

 

Optional: Stearns, Chapter 21 (7E &8E), “The First Industrial Revolution: Western Society, 1780-1914”

 

 

F          9/29     PAPER #1 DUE.

           

Week 5  

T         10/3     Sexuality and the Rise of the Japanese Nation-State

            Reading: Review Sabine Frühstück, “Sexuality and the Nation-State,” Chapter 2, A Global History of Sexuality

Sex in Global History: Hiratsuka Haru (pen name Raicho), “Restoring Women’s Talents” (1911)

 

Optional: Sterns, Chapter 20, (7E &8E), “East Asia: Vital Trends in Politics and Trade” (Japan)

 

Th       10/5     Inventing Normalcy and Deviance

            Reading: 

            Sex in Global History: Michel Foucault, The History of Sexuality, Volume 1 (1976), “We “Other Victorians”.”

Sex in Global History: Richard Krafft-Ebbing, Psychopathia Sexualis (1886).

 

Week 6  

T         10/10   Monday Schedule Followed

 

Th       10/12   MIDTERM  

 

Week 7

T         10/17  Race, Sex, and Western Imperialism: Africa and South Asia

            Reading:

            Mytheli Sreenivas, “Sexuality and Modern Imperialism”, p. 69-88, A Global History of Sexuality.

            Sex in Global History: “Pederasty,” The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night,  Translated by Richard Burton (1886)

 

            Recommended: FILM “The Victorian Sex Explorer” (2008), with Rupert Everett https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUfWOF3NbY4

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 22 (7E &8E), “World Economy and Western Imperialism: Africa and South Asia”

 

Th       10/19   Imperial Order, Sexual Order: Race Suicide and Settler Societies

            Reading:

            Sex in Global History: Edward Clarke, Sex in Education (1873)

Sex in Global History: Theodore Roosevelt, “On American Motherhood” (1905)

            Sex in Global History: Lola Landau, “The Companionate Marriage” (1929)

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 23 (7E &8E), “The Settler Societies: The West on Frontiers”

 

Week 8

T         10/24   Sex Trafficking

            Reading:  Robert Buffington and Donna Guy, “Sex Trafficking,” Chapter 6, A Global History of Sexuality

            Sex in Global History: W. T. Stead, The Maiden Tribute of Modern Babylon (1885).

 

Th       10/26   Social Regulation of Sexuality in 20th Century China

            Reading:

            Sex in Global History: Han Yi, “Destroying the Family,” (1907)

            Sex in Global History: Susan Mann, “Sexuality and the Other”

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 25 (7E &8E), “The Middle East and China in the Imperialist Century”

 

Week 9

T         10/31   Third Sexes and the Fight for Homosexual Rights     

            Reading:

            Sex in Global History: Sigmund Freud, “The Sexual Aberrations,” (1905)      

            Sex in Global History: Veronika Fuechtner, “Indians, Jews, and Sex: Magnus Hirschfeld and Indian Sexology,” in Imagining Germany Imagining Asia (New York: Camden House, 2013), 111-130.

Sex in Global History: Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, (1928), Chapter 19,

Sex in Global History: Paragraph 175, Nazi Germany

 

Th       11/2     Making the Modern Girl

            Reading: 

Sex in Global History: Hai Ren, “Sexuality and Mass Media,” A Global History of Sexuality

Sex in Global History: “The Modern Girl Around the World: Cosmetics Advertising and the Politics of Race and Style”

            Sex in Global History: Vicki Ruiz, “The Flapper and the Chaperone”

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 27 (8E)/ Chapter 28 (7E),   “The West in the Contemporary Period”

 

Week 10

T         11/7     Queering Migrations Across Borders

            Reading:

            Julio Capo, Jr., "Queering Mariel: Mediating Cold War Foreign Policy and U.S. Citizenship among Cuba's Homosexual Exile Community, 1978-1994," Journal of American Ethnic History 29 (2010),  78-106. 

            Eithne Luibheid, "Looking Like a Lesbian: The Organization of Sexual Monitoring at the United States - Mexican Border," Journal of the History of Sexuality 8 (1998), 477-506. 

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 24 (7E &8E), “The Development of Latin American Civilization”

           

Th       11/9     Birth Control

            Reading:

Sex in Global History: Katherine Mayo, Mother India (New York 1927).

Sex in Global History: M.K. Gandhi, "Drain-Inspector's Report," Young India (15 Sept. 1927).

 

Optional: Stearns, Chapter 30 (8E)/ Chapter 29 (7E),  “India and Southeast Asia”

 

 

Week 11

T         11/18   Sex and Sexuality at War

Reading:

            Sex in Global History: Maria Rosa Henson,  Comfort Woman: A Filipina’s Story of Prostitution and Slavery Under the Japanese Military

 

Th       11/20   Sex Education

Reading:

Sex in Global History: Jonathan Zimmerman, “A Right to Knowledge: Culture, Diversity, and Education in the Age of AIDS, 1984-2010,” in Too Hot to Handle: A Global History of Sex Education (Princeton University Press, 2016), 115-129.

Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (2015) Sex Education.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0jQz6jqQS0    

 

F          11/21  PAPER #2 DUE In section

 

Week 12

T         11/21  Thanksgiving Break, No School

Th       11/23   Thanksgiving Break, No School

 

Week 13

T         11/28   Sex and Gender after WWII

            Reading:

Sex in Global History: Alfred Kinsey, Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953), "Homosexual Responses and Contacts”

Sex in Global History: Paul Ehrlich, The Population Bomb. Excerpts.

Sex in Global History: Vernon Rosario, Rise and Fall of the Medical Model, The Gay & Lesbian Review Worldwide; Boston19.6 (Nov/Dec 2012): 39-41.

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 28 (8E)/ Chapter 29 (7E), “Russia and Eastern Europe”

           

Th       11/30   Transgender History

            Reading:  Sex in Global History: Genny Beemyn, “Transgender History in the United States,” (2014).

 

 

Week 14

T         12/5     Sexual Revolutions: Sexual Rights, Human Rights

            Reading:  Richard Parker, Jonathan Garcia, and Robert M. Buffington, “Sexuality and the Contemporary World: Globalization and Sexual Rights,” A Global History of Sexuality

            Sex in Global History: Radicalesbians, “The Woman-Identified Woman,” (1970)

           

Th       12/7     The Meanings of Sex in the Contemporary World

            Reading: Richard Parker, Jonathan Garcia, and Robert M. Buffington, “Sexuality and the Contemporary World: Globalization and Sexual Rights,” A Global History of Sexuality

 

            Optional: Stearns, Chapter 34 (8E)/ Chapter 25 (7E), “Themes in Contemporary World History: Into the 21st Century”

           

Week 15

T         12/12   Overview and Review

 

FINAL


 

Peter Stearns, World History in Brief: Major Patterns of Change and Continuity, Volume 2 (Since 1450). Pearson.

 

Seventh Edition

Eight Edition

Chapter 16    The West and the World: Discovery, Colonization, and Trade

Chapter 16    The West and the World: Discovery, Colonization, and Trade

Chapter 17    Western Civilization Changes Shape in the Early Modern Centuries

Chapter 17    Western Civilization Changes Shape in the Early Modern Centuries

Chapter 18    The Rise of Russia

Chapter 18    The Rise of Russia

Chapter 19    The Ottoman and Mughal Empires

Chapter 19    The Islamic Empires

Chapter 20    East Asia: Vital Trends in Politics and Trade

Chapter 20    East Asia: Vital Trends in Politics and Trade

Chapter 21   The First Industrial Revolution: Western Society, 1780–1914

Chapter 21   The First Industrial Revolution: Western Society, 1780–1914

Chapter 22    World Economy and Western Imperialism: Africa and South Asia

Chapter 22    World Economy and Western Imperialism: Africa and South Asia

Chapter 23   The Settler Societies: The West on Frontiers

Chapter 23   The Settler Societies: The West on Frontiers

Chapter 24   The Development of Latin American Civilization

Chapter 24   The Development of Latin American Civilization

Chapter 25   The Middle East and China in the Imperialist Century

Chapter 25   The Middle East and China in the Imperialist Century

Chapter 26   Russia and Japan: Industrialization Outside the West

Chapter 26   Russia and Japan: Industrialization Outside the West

Chapter 27   World War I and the End of an Era

 

Chapter 28    The West in the Contemporary Period

Chapter 27    The West in the Contemporary Period

Chapter 29    Eastern European Civilization

Chapter 28    Russia and Eastern Europe

Chapter 30    East Asia in the 20th and Early 21st Centuries

Chapter 29    East Asia in the 20th and Early 21st Centuries

Chapter 31    India and Southeast Asia

Chapter 30    India and Southeast Asia

Chapter 32    Middle-Eastern Civilization in the 20th Century

Chapter 31    Middle-Eastern Civilization in the Contemporary Era

Chapter 33    Latin America in the 20th Century

Chapter 32   Latin America in the Contemporary Era

Chapter 34    Sub-Saharan Africa: From Colonies to New Nations

Chapter 33    Sub-Saharan Africa: From Colonies to New Nations

Chapter 35    The Early 21st Century: World History and the Future

Chapter 34    Themes in Contemporary World History: Into the 21st Century