Rebecca Woodland, Ph.D.

Associate Professor | Educational Leadership & Administration Program

School of Education | University of Massachusetts | 259 Hills House South | 

Amherst,  MA  01003 | 413.545.1751 PH | 413.545.1523 FX

Rebecca.Woodland@educ.umass.edu

 

The definition of success--To laugh much; to win respect of intelligent persons and the affections of children; to earn the approbation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to give one's self; to leave the world a little better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition.; to have played and laughed with enthusiasm, and sung with exultation; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived--this is to have succeeded.

           --  Ralph Waldo Emerson

Rebecca Woodland is an associate professor of Educational Leadership & Administration. A former secondary school teacher in Massachusetts and Colorado, she received her BA in political science from UMass-Amherst (1991), her MA in special education from the University of Northern Colorado (1996), and the PhD in educational leadership from Colorado State University (2001). Dr. Woodland has been the principal investigator on a number of large-scale evaluation research projects and was awarded the prestigious Marcia Guttentag award for excellence in evaluation by the American Evaluation Association in 2005. Her scholarship focuses on instructional leadership, school improvement, and organizational collaboration. 

Rebecca Woodland, Ph.D. CV

                                                                                                      

The definition of success--To laugh much; to win respect of intelligent persons and the affections of children; to earn the approbation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends; to appreciate beauty; to find the best in others; to give one's self; to leave the world a little better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition.; to have played and laughed with enthusiasm, and sung with exultation; to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived--this is to have succeeded.


-Bessie Anderson Stanley, 1904

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