Chapter 7: Weak Adjectives

 

There are two types of adjectives in Old English: Strong Adjectives, which we covered in the previous chapter, and weak adjectives. Almost all Old English adjectives can be either strong or weak, depending on how they are used in a sentence. "Strong" and "weak" are just labels that tell you what ending the adjective takes depending on the case (which, you'll remember, marks the grammatical function) of the noun it is modifying,

Weak Adjectives do not stand on their own; they come paired with a demonstrative.

Alfred the wise king ruled Wessex.

 

In the example sentence "old" is a weak adjective; the demonstrative pronoun "the" is paired with it.

Weak Declension Adjectives Pardigms

 

Singular Weak Adjectives

Case Masculine Neuter Feminine
Nominative a e e
Genitive an an an
Accusative an e an
Dative and Instrumental an an an

 

Plural Weak Adjectives

Case All Genders
Nominative an
Genitive ra or ena
Accusative an
Dative and Instrumental um

 

Weak Declension Adjectives Examples

god = good

 

Singular Weak Adjectives (Examples)

Case Masculine Neuter Feminine
Nominative goda gode gode
Genitive godan godan godan
Accusative godan gode godan
Dative and Instrumental godan godan godan

 

Plural Weak Adjectives (Examples)

Case All Genders
Nominative godan
Genitive godra or godena
Accusative godan
Dative and Instrumental godum

 

Chapter 7 Vocabulary Words

Some exercises to practice translating Weak Adjectives

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