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Updated on:
8/14/13

 

E 791: OLD ENGLISH

Notes

 

As you begin to memorize Old English words, start with closed-class words. Conjunctions, pronouns, prepositions, and articles are not numerous. You may want to make a chart for ease:

[th]aer
1
conj
there (adv.)
swa
2
conj
as (adv.)
aer
21
conj
before (adv., prep.)
ac
56
conj
but
nu
59
conj
now (adv.)
o[th][th]e
155
conj
or
gif
160
conj
if

To which you can add ond, eac, [th]eah, etc.

14.VIII.13 PDF versions of (almost) all the texts we are translating this term will be made available on-line. Here they are in one place:

You can also find html versions at the Labyrinth.

14.VIII.13 Vocabulary comes from a word frequency analysis of the Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records. Click here for a list of the most frequently used words in Old English poetry.

14.VIII.13 Final Paper is due by 13 Dec., 4 p.m. Two topics.

    Topic One. Edit, translate, and comment on an Old English poem. Comments include an overview of the major issues in the critical history of the poem, grammatical commentary, and etymological commentary.

    Topic Two. Describe the major issues in the critical history of a poem. Then discuss the poem or portions of it in its literary, social, or historical context.